Videos

Microphone squeal analogy for machining chatterModulated tool path turning study

In this research effort, modulated tool path (MTP) turning is analyzed. Tube turning (which provides orthogonal cutting conditions) is completed with modulated feed motion to break continuous chips into small sections. The experimental setup includes measurement of force, temperature, tool wear, and feed motion. A high-speed camera is used to capture chip formation. Videos of the continuous and broken chip formation from constant feed and MTP motion are included to demonstrate the results (75 m/min cutting speed).

.mp4 files

No MTP: 0.0508 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.1016 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.1524 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.2032 mm/rev

MTP (0.5 oscillations per revolution, 0.8 amplitude of nominal feed): 0.0508 mm/rev

MTP: 0.1016 mm/rev

MTP: 0.1524 mm/rev

MTP: 0.2032 mm/rev

.avi files

No MTP: 0.0508 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.1016 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.1524 mm/rev

No MTP: 0.2032 mm/rev

MTP (0.5 oscillations per revolution, 0.8 amplitude of nominal feed): 0.0508 mm/rev

MTP: 0.1016 mm/rev

MTP: 0.1524 mm/rev

MTP: 0.2032 mm/rev

 

Microphone squeal analogy for machining chatter
This PowerPoint file demonstrates the analogy between the squeal frequency experienced when audio feedback causes instability in public address systems and the chatter frequency exhibited by machining operations. A simple microphone/speaker setup is described, video is presented, and experimental results are compared to machining stability predictions.
Microphone and speaker setup used to demonstrate the analogy between microphone squeal and machining chatter.

Microphone and speaker setup used to demonstrate the analogy between microphone squeal and machining chatter.

 

Dr. Schmitz in eKidz series

Dr. Schmitz appeared in the Elevation Church eKidz six-part video series entitled: H2O Sink or Swim. He portrayed Coach Turner who trains two lifeguards for the Southeastern Regional Lifeguard Trials. The series message is based on Hebrews 11, the “Hall of Faith”.
Coach Turner portrayed by Dr. Schmitz

Coach Turner portrayed by Dr. Schmitz

Dr. Schmitz also appeared in the Elevation Church eKidz video series entitled: BEATS. The series discusses the beatitudes from Matthew 5.

 

Milling dynamics primer

Dr. Schmitz provides an introduction to machining dynamics in the video “Understanding machining dynamics” co-authored by Dr. Scott Smith, UNC Charlotte. The video is presented by BlueSwarf University.

 

Milling stability and process damping

Two common barriers to optical milling productivity are tool/workpiece chatter and tool wear. The challenge for process engineers is to select the proper machining parameters to eliminate chatter and achieve acceptable tool wear rates for the most efficient production of accurate parts.

This video presentation describes modeling/simulation of the milling process in order to generate stability lobe diagrams that identify stable spindle speed-axial depth of cut combinations. Stability lobe diagrams can be used to avoid costly, time-consuming trial-and-error adjustments to machining parameters. The concept of process damping, which enables increased axial depths of cut at low spindle speeds, is introduced. For titanium machining, where surface speed is limited by tool wear, this phenomenon can also be captured within the stability lobe diagram and used to increase metal removal rates.

 

College football highlights

Dr. Schmitz played free safety at Temple University (1990-91). A few highlights from his senior season have been collected in this video.

 

Impact of manufacturing job losses

This video from the NY Times describes how a decline in US manufacturing can lead to the loss of other kinds of jobs.

 

The Pigskin Professor in action

The Pigskin Professor

Dr. Schmitz developed a series of videos that describe engineering fundamentals in the language of football. This was a collaboration with the Digital Worlds Institute at the University of Florida. Project principals included Tony Schmitz (writer and on-camera talent), Greg Sawyer (on-camera foil), Arturo Sinclair (director and animator), Marc Hoit (producer), Joella Walz (associate producer), and James Oliverio (executive producer).

 

The Science of NFL Football

Dr. Schmitz served as the science advisor for the Emmy award winning “Science of NFL Football” video series, a collaboration between the National Science Foundation, NBC Learn (the education division of NBC News), and the National Football League (NFL). This 10-part video series: 1) explored concepts from physics, biology, mathematics, chemistry, and engineering; and 2) demonstrated how these concepts are integral to football. The three to five-minute segments are used by 5th to 12th grade science teachers and college-level instructors. The goal of the project was to use exciting and relevant sports content to teach fundamental science and engineering concepts. Dr. John Ziegert, UNC Charlotte, also appeared in the video series.

 

Machine Tool Genome Project

The objective of this project is to enable pre-process milling parameter selection for “first part correct” production. This will replace the current practice of trial-and-error part path validation and will be achieved by predicting the tool point frequency response function using the RCSA algorithm (see the RCSA page for more information). Given the tool point response, frequency-domain algorithms for stability and surface location error can be applied to separate feasible and infeasible zones within the spindle speed-axial depth of cut domain. Once acceptable spindle speed-axial depth of cut combinations are determined, they will be presented in a new user-friendly format, the Tool Dashboard, similar to an automotive dashboard display. The intended customer for this project is any user of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining technology. This work is a collaboration with Manufacturing Laboratories, Inc. and BlueSwarf. The motivation for the project is provided in a video produced by David Barton, BlueSwarf.

 

High-speed videos of  turning operations

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have posted a selection of movie files showing material flow and temperature distribution during orthogonal machining.